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John Wiebe, Ph.D.John Wiebe, Ph.D.

The goal of this study is to understand the association between substance use and sexual risk behavior in a sample of Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) and are living with HIV on the U.S./Mexico border. The specific aims are:

1. To identify and describe substance use patterns among HIV+ Latino MSM on the U.S./Mexico border. It is hypothesized that this group will demonstrate lower levels of intravenous drug use and greater alcohol consumption per drinking event than has been demonstrated by other HIV+ MSM in the U.S.

2. To document the frequency and context of risky sexual activity among HIV+ Latino MSM on the U.S./Mexico border. It is hypothesized that individuals will report significant risk behavior on both sides of the border.

3. To examine both global and event-based associations between substance use and risky sexual activity in this group. It is hypothesized that both global and event-based measures of substance use will be related to risky sexual activity.

4. To explore the role of acculturation in risky sexual activity, substance use, and the relationship between substances and sexual activity in this group. It is hypothesized that acculturation will moderate any observed ethnicity effects.

5. To evaluate the “cognitive escape” model (McKirnan, Ostrow, & Hope, 1996) of the association between substance use and risky sexual activity in this group. It is hypothesized that HIV prevention burnout will increase over time, and that the interaction between substance use and expectancies for escape from HIV risk awareness will predict sexual risk in both cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis